Bending Stability of Corrugated Tubes With Anisotropic Frustum Shells

Abstract

Thin-walled corrugated tubes that have a bending multistability, such as the bendy straw, allow for variable orientations over the tube length. Compared to the long history of corrugated tubes in practical applications, the mechanics of the bending stability and how it is affected by the cross sections and other geometric parameters remain unknown. To explore the geometry-driven bending stabilities, we used several tools, including a reduced-order simulation package, a simplified linkage model, and physical prototypes. We found the bending stability of a circular two-unit corrugated tube is dependent on the longitudinal geometry and the stiffness of the crease lines that connect separate frusta. Thinner shells, steeper cones, and weaker creases are required to achieve bending bi-stability. We then explored how the bending stability changes as the cross section becomes elongated or distorted with concavity. We found the bending bi-stability is favored by deep and convex cross sections, while wider cross sections with a large concavity remain mono-stable. The different geometries influence the amounts of stretching and bending energy associated with bending the tube. The stretching energy has a bi-stable profile and can allow for a stable bent configuration, but it is counteracted by the bending energy which increases monotonically. The findings from this work can enable informed design of corrugated tube systems with desired bending stability behavior.

Publication
ASME Journal of Applied Mechanics